Coast birds

Wildlife species in danger of disappearing from East Anglia

Experts from Suffolk Wildlife Trust, Buglife and the RSPB have all pointed to species in danger of disappearing from East Anglia. They include stone curlew - only 202 pairs nested in the East of England last year; the shrill carder bee - common in the region 25 years ago but now found only in the Thames Gateway area; and the crested cow-wheat - a plant limited to a small number of roadside verges because grassland has disappeared to farming or construction. Indeed, habitat destruction and human disturbance are cited as the two most common reasons these species are on the brink.

De Tapuit verdwijnt als broedvogel uit de Veluwe

De tapuit Oenanthe oenanthe heeft het in Nederland en de ons omringende landen moeilijk. Dit jaar is er zelfs geen enkel broedgeval op de Veluwe gevonden. Daarmee is deze vogel in Gelderland als broedvogel vermoedelijk uitgestorven. Tapuiten leven in duinen, open grasland, heide en stuifzand. Ze eten insecten en broeden in holen, meestal oude konijnenholen. In dertig jaar is het aantal broedparen in Nederland met 90% afgenomen: van ruim 2000 naar ongeveer 200.

Lachmöwen zieht es immer seltener an den Bodensee

Möwen gehörten lange Zeit zum bekannten Bild des Bodensees und gelten für manche noch immer als Quälgeister. Doch wie bei vielen anderen Vogelarten am größten Binnengewässer Deutschlands ist ein markanter Artenschwund eingetreten. Die oft riesigen Schwärme von Möwen, die einst die Schiffe und Fähren umkreisten, scheinen Vergangenheit zu sein. Ornithologen und Naturschützer gehen davon aus, dass von früher 30 000 bis 40 000 Lachmöwen – der am Bodensee häufigsten Art – zurzeit gerade mal noch etwa 10 000 hier überwintern.

Bangladesh lost 80% of its birds in less than 25 years

Once a land of indigenous and migratory birds, Bangladesh is witnessing rapid decline in the number of birds in recent years, conservationists say. In the country’s coastal belt and Sonadia island in particular, the population of birds, as suggested by their movement, came down to a half in a year. Countrywide, the number of birds as counted by their presence here and there, declined by 40,000 this year compared to a year before, according to a census.

One in 10 Hong Kong bird species is at risk of extinction

For many people in Hong Kong, talk of endangered species conjures up images of wildlife whose natural habitats are “out there”, somewhere far away – such as giant pandas in the bamboo forests of Sichuan province, polar bears in the Arctic and miniature monkeys in the Brazilian rainforest. If, like me, you are a birdwatcher, however, the list of threatened species feels far closer to home.

Shorebirds face extinction

A worldwide catastrophe is underway among an extraordinary group of birds — the marathon migrants we know as shorebirds. Numbers of some species are falling so quickly that many biologists fear an imminent planet-wide wave of extinctions. These declines represent the No. 1 conservation crisis facing birds in the world today. No doubt you’ve seen some of these birds while on vacation at the beach, skittering back and forth along the cusp of waves as they peck with their long beaks for tiny sand flies or the eggs of horseshoe crabs.

South Africa’s seabirds are in serious decline

Over five years in the making, The State of South Africa’s Birds 2018 report used national survey and monitoring data to create a picture of the conservation status of the country’s birds and their habitats. Unfortunately, the study outlines several troubling tends. Overall, it found that 132 of the 856 species in the country were threatened or near-threatened in the country, with 13 Critically Endangered – just one step away from being extinct in South Africa.

Nesting Kittiwake numbers have plummeted by 87% on the Orkney and Shetland Islands since 2000

The Kittiwake bird (Rissa tridactyla) has been placed on the world’s most-threatened birds list. The Kittiwake is a small cliff-nesting species of gull names for its distinctive “kitt-i-wake” call. Ireland is home to significant numbers of the Kittiwake species, which breed at colonies around the Irish coast. It has now been considered to be globally threatened, as it was listed on the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Threatened Species.

Kittiwake numbers 'down 50% in 25 years' in Wales

A seabird placed on an endangered species list has seen its numbers in Wales decline by 50% in 25 years, an expert has said. The kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla) , along with the Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica), joined the IUCN Red List of endangered species on 12 December. The two both nest in Wales and are part of a group of nine UK-visiting birds which were put on the global list. Many of Wales' seabirds are found on south west coastal islands such as Skomer and Skokholm off Pembrokeshire.

World's birds on brink of extinction

Birds that are now globally threatened include the kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla) and the Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica), which breed on UK sea cliffs. Meanwhile, on land, the Snowy Owl is struggling to find prey as ice melts in the North American Arctic, say conservation groups. The iconic bird is listed as vulnerable to extinction for the first time. Worldwide, over a quarter of more than 200 bird species reassessed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature have been moved to higher threat categories.